Plastic Reflow with Induction

Ambrell has over 10,000 systems installed in over 50 countries and many of them are plastic reflow application installations.

plastic reflow with induction

lorem ipsum

We offer exceptional customer service before and after the sale. Your plastic reflow application will be analyzed and tested in the nearest Ambrell Applications Lab. There is no charge, and you will receive a system recommendation designed to deliver the best possible solution for your brazing requirements. Ambrell delivers the expertise, innovation and system quality to give your company a competitive edge.

Ambrell: About Induction Heating

Read our 4-page brochure "About Induction Heating". Learn more about how the science of induction technology can solve your precision heating problems.

Click to read one of our plastic reflow Application Notes (after a brief registration). Learn more about:

Plastic reflow with induction heating

A large number of polymeric materials come under the plastic classification. Polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, and the fluorocarbons, epoxies, phenolics, and polyester may all be classified as plastics. When viewed as a whole, plastics have a wide variety of combinations of properties. Some are very rigid and brittle; others are flexible, exhibiting both elastic and plastic deformations when stressed, and sometimes experiencing considerable deformation before fracture. Plastic components may also contain glass particles, various fibers, or other polymers.

Plastic reflow involves any process where the plastic becomes liquid, which including a wide range of applications from metal reclaiming to thermoplastic composites manufacture.

plastic reflow image

Modern induction heating provides reliable, repeatable, non-contact and energy-efficient heat in a minimal amount of time. Solid state systems are capable of heating very small areas within precise production tolerances, without disturbing individual metallurgical characteristics.

Induction heating has great potential in the area of plastic reflow because of the controlled rapid application of heat. However, one hurdle must be cleared in order for induction to work; plastics do not conduct current.

Non-conductive materials can often be heated very effectively by using a conductive metal susceptor to transfer the heat, or by placing conductive fibers or powder within the plastic itself. Heating potential in all of the above scenarios is solely based on the concentration and type of conductive material. If a powder is too fine or at too small of a concentration, then the particles will not be affected by the field and eddy currents will not form.

Induction systems typically used for plastic reflow range from 1 to 10kW, depending on the parts and application requirements.

utm_medium material docid title title_DE title_FR title_PT blurb regn_link
plastic-reflow plastic catheter_02 Thermoplastic Welding With PVC Tubing Thermoplastic Welding With PVC Tubing Thermoplastic Welding With PVC Tubing Thermoplastic Welding With PVC Tubing Heating of the mandrel is from the inside out providing a smooth finish on the outside of the assemblies.  
plastic-reflow steel plasticreflow_1 Heating A Steel Nail File For Insertion Into a Plastic Handle Heating A Steel Nail File For Insertion Into a Plastic Handle Heating A Steel Nail File For Insertion Into a Plastic Handle Heating A Steel Nail File For Insertion Into a Plastic Handle Through the use of the Ambell EASYHEAT 1kW system and a three-turn pancake style coil, 3000F was reached and plastic reflow occurred in two seconds with no external flashing, melting or blemishes.  
plastic-reflow plastic med_reflow Plastic Reflow With Catheter Tubing Plastic Reflow With Catheter Tubing Plastic Reflow With Catheter Tubing Plastic Reflow With Catheter Tubing Heat a metal braid in a plastic catheter tube to 250°F (121.1ºC) so that another catheter tube can be bonded to it.